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Women's Series: Chloe Bodur




Chloe Bodur is an exciting musician coming out of North West London. She brings a different type of genre blending sound. Recently releasing Panties & Loafers her debut EP. She has seen it being played on Radio 1 and recently had her EP named as the number one EP of the week by Radio 1XTRA DJ Jamz Supernova.

Chloe and I met on an early winter’s morning, taking a walk around the Cricklewood area where she grew up, chatting about everything from her biggest inspirations to changes that need to be made within UK music.

How would you describe your music/sound?

“I call it psychedelic soul and occasionally RnBossa”

What’s been the biggest influence on your music and yourself as a woman?

“Recently, imagery of the ten Mahavidyas, in particular the goddesses Kali and Matangi have inspired the sound of my music and the way I hold myself aesthetically.”





What has had the greatest effect on your music, the area you grew up in or your peers/parents?

“My mum’s love of soul and disco and cousin's love of The Neptunes definitely moulded the way I sing and the way I write melodies and harmonies so I’d say my family’s musical taste affected my music more than growing up in London did.”





Have you found it harder to find your voice as a woman in the music industry and what are some of the challenges you feel you've overcome?

“Yes it's hard to get a seat at the table and it can feel uncomfortable being the only woman in the room/studio at times. It’s also frustrating having to ‘look the part’ in ways that men aren’t expected to, it’s tiring and expensive and I wish women could just pull up make-up free in jeans and a t-shirt the way men do for photoshoots, interviews etc and receive the same admiration and respect but we’re not quite there yet.

I’ve overcome the challenge of seeking approval from some of the men within the industry by instead focusing my energy and time on the amazing women that already support me - like my manager Jenny and DJ’s that always support my releases like Jamz Supernova and Jyoty. Men love to support other men, it comes with ease to them so its important us women do the same."





What advice would you give a younger woman, that perhaps you wish you knew at a younger age?

It’s ok to say no! Don’t do anything just to please other people, just do whatever you want to do. Own your sensuality.”




What facilities/types of support are needed for more representation for women in music?

“FUNDING! Especially for women from working class Asian, Black and minority backgrounds. Being a woman is one barrier to overcome but being a not-white woman without rich parents is an even bigger mountain to climb. Also just generally more representation of diverse women in music on TV, festival line-ups, on radio etc will encourage a whole new generation of young female artists.”




What are some women that inspire you in life? Can be within music or out of it.

“Solange, Rosalia, Beyonce, Dolly Parton, Missy Elliot, MIA, Alicia Keys to name a few. Also I wanted to be just like Avril Lavigne when I was little so I asked for an electric guitar for my 7th birthday so thanks Avril!”

Do you feel there are enough support networks for women in music?

“Not that are accessible to all. There's lots of courses and networking opportunities for ‘women in music’ but some of them charge £150+ for one day which just isn’t feasible for some people. I’d like to see a diverse range of women being introduced into the industry, not just an elite group of women filtered out by class/economic status.

“The free or affordable networks for women available at the moment though are great, I went to Red Bulls’ ‘Normal vs Novelty’ masterclass for female producers a few years ago and loved it.”







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