ECO WARRIORS

Director & Photographer Eliška Sky
Camera Harry Nelder
Set designer Katrine Roberts
Styling Brenda Beaux
Makeup artist Hatti Rees
Hair stylist Dylan Jack Mcconnachie
Talents Hatti Rees, Liza Molnar, Hakama Nabila, Yiling Zhao
Bts camera Sofia Boriosi
Photography assistants Plusia Roms & Mireia Ludevid
Makeup assistant Azami
Fashion designers: Lili Zhao, Yasmin Whitlock, Jamie Challinor, Hawking Yuo Chen, Vincent Lapp,
Matilda Aberg, Ju-nna, David Brunnbauer, Dohye Yun, Eva Wuyang, Phoenix Li Wu, Yiwei Wu,
Maison Soksi, Shaun Jordan, Nicole Zisman, Berenike Corcuera, Ella Roberts & Samson Leung

A Beginner's guide for Eco-Warriors is a project created by the art director & photographer Eliška Sky. The main inspiration comes from the current dramatic changes in Earth’s ecosystem due to the human impact, the so-called age of Anthropocene. This project represents, with a certain level of exaggeration and humour, tips and inspirations on how to lower the ecological footprint and contribute to the slowing down of global warming and the protection of natural habitats. A beginner's guide for Eco-Warriors then becomes a tool for eco-warriors and invites for reflection and reaction from viewers.

White pleated dress: Lili Zhao
Hat: Yasmin Whitlock
Gloves: Jamie Challinor
Draped shoes: Hawking Yuhou Chen

Vincent Lapp blue jumpsuit

Red Cape: Matilda Aberg
Dress: Ju-nna
Skirt: David Brunnbauer
Gloves: Dohye Yun
Jewellry: Eva Wuyang

What is the significance of the use of the cloudy sky backdrop/set design?


The cloudy sky backdrop was a connection point for the project and linked all diverse themes together. It represents the air which is unique for our planet and allows for life and nature to exist. So a perfect fit for this ecologically themed project.


In which one of the ways you have artistically presented do you feel is most effective in slowing down our ecological impact?


It’s hard to pick just one way, but definitely preserving and protecting nature and natural habitats is the key. This links to other issues such as pollution and overfishing as well.


What challenges did you face during the process of organising this production?


The big challenge was to research and coherently connect all of the topics for this project. I had to edit and narrow down the ecological problems to the clear categories and create mood boards for each individual scene. We then worked closely with the set designer Katrine Roberts and stylist Brenda Beaux to achieve the looks.

 

Putting this all together on the day of the shoot was another challenge. We had a limited time in the studio with many ideas and looks and did both filming and photography. Although I had sketches ready, not everything went according to plan and we had to improvise. In the initial idea was that, there would be 3-4models in each scene! But this was unachievable in the time frame and we had to flexible.

How long did the process of execution take from concept to the final product? And why?


I had the idea for this project in my head for a while and was waiting for the right time to make it happen. So the preparation took few weeks, but the actual filming and taking
photographs took just 11hours. I wish we had more time, but the budget for the project was already exceeded and large London studios, which we needed, are expensive.

 

The photography scanning and retouching took around 2 weeks, but the film post-process took around 3 months. I did the film editing myself and had to find free time for it. The longest in the process was the audio and music research.

NABILA (bottom)
Mask: Phoenix Li Wu,
Skirt: Ju-nna,
Black headpiece: Yiwei Wu
Shoes: David Brunnbauer
Tights: Maison Soksi

LIZA (top)
Head & flower piece: David Brunnbauer
White top: Hawking Yuo Chen
Black corset: Jamie Challinor
Pants: hand made by stylist
Eyes: stylist made

White corset: Ella Roberts
Circle light dress: Berenike Corcuera
Blouse: David Brunnbauer
White corset: Ella Roberts

Zentai suits: Photographer’s own
Leaves: set designer made

We love the way you incorporated the elements into fashion attire, how much fun did you have doing so?


Yes, I really love combining the concept and fashion together! It was Brenda who brought amazing outfits from new designers and brands which were a perfect match for the themes. We also brought various props and she cleverly incorporated them into the outfits. Hairstylist Dylan McConnachie and makeup artist Hatti Rees helped immensely to complete the looks.


I have to say, that it was very fun to see Brenda arriving in her small car full to the brim with outfits and props in the morning. Also Katrine with this huge handmade eyeball rolling around! It was definitely exciting to see it coming all together in the shoot. I want the models to really express themselves in my projects so they can explore the movement. So it becomes more of a performance piece. 

How would you like the viewers of your piece to incorporate your message into their daily lives for a lasting effect?


It would be great if the viewers get inspired by my work to question their options towards the environment in everyday life. I don’t think anyone can be 100% eco, but simple daily improvements can be made and make a huge impact. Specifically, I would like the viewers to think about where are their products and clothes coming from, buy nature-based products (from washing liquid to shampoo), switching utilities to renewable energy, eat as much as plant-based food as possible, value and cherish nature, pressure government for positive changes towards environment.

Where there any ecological struggles you faced while putting the production together?


e.g. wastage etc. As with any production, there are always ecological struggles. We did our best to make the project as environmentally friendly as possible so we used recycled materials and paper for the majority of props. I even went as far as making pizza and salad at home for everyone, so we didn’t have to get delivered food in plastic containers :)

 

Why was it important for you to present such an important topic in such a creative and humorous way?


I feel that humour is a very important tool for bringing important issues to wider audience. It makes viewers relaxed. I wanted to focus on the positive side and show how we can all make an impact by changing everyday decisions.


The film is so well put together and ties all your concepts together very well. Where did the audio voice-overs come from and why were they chosen as opposed to something else?


The audio clips are from various retro commercials and educational and documentary films. It’s very interesting to me how the TV culture changed throughout the years. In the 70s
and ’80s, there was more emphasis on the speech and detailed explanation, meanwhile, nowadays the TV is visual with quick cuts. I guess it goes hand in hand with digital filmmaking and editing and viewers’ attention span, but I find certain beauty and humour in the old way of filming and TV presenting. The voices of presenters have this funny excitement and you feel like all is explained to every detail. This clear enthusiastic message was something that I needed to connect with the visuals, to strongly resonate with viewers in a positive manner.

Jumpsuit and a headpiece: Vincent Lapp
Blouses: Dohye Yun
Shoes: David Brunnbauer
Waist tie: Dohye Yun

Head piece: Jamie Challinor
Top: Hawking Yuo Chen
Corset: Shaun Jordan
Skirt: Yasmin Whitlock
White gloves & Shoes: Yasmin Whitlock
Black gloves: Jamie Challinor

Salmon jumpsuit: Phoenix Li Wu
White fur: Dohye Yun
Face accessories: Eva Wuyang
Shoes: David brunnbauer

Vincent Lapp jumpsuit

You incorporated a list of designers into this project, what was the process of deciding what garments would be worn for each ecological representation?


Brenda chose the designers according to each topic and brought a wide selection to the studio. We could then decide on the day which outfit will be the best for which scene. The outfits’ customisation with props made the connection even more apparent.


What can we expect from you next?


I had lots of fashion and commercial projects this year, which was great for the promotion, the financial side of things and my clients portfolio. Now I’m really looking forward to personal art projects where I can have full creative freedom. I’m very excited about A
beginner’s guide for Eco Warriors to be published with NEW WAVE! My next photographs waiting for publishing are part of the series Womaneroes, where I challenge the view on a woman's body. Due to the quarantine, I have time to focus on contacting magazines,
finishing retouching and working on new ideas, which is great. I’ve been preparing the new environmental project Parasites for a while and can’t wait to start it when the quarantine is lifted. I’m also planning to start a Youtube channel about photography.

Suits like outfit by Nicole Zisman

Yellow jacket: Samson Leung

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